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Lifestyle changes drive the property market

According to the dictionary, synergy is what you get when things combine to produce an effect potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts, or something like that. Anyway, it’s a nice concept and you could argue that two recent announcements affecting the Swansea Bay region represent ideal ingredients. The first is the submission of plans for a £37 million student development opposite Swansea’s High Street station. The other is a ground-breaking £6.5m Wales-wide agreement which will create construction training for 1,100 people per year. I know that there’s been some mixed reaction to proposals by Varsity Projects Limited for a 725-bed scheme on what is currently Mariner Street C

Deciding what's in the public interest

I don’t know about you, but I’d always assumed the most noteworthy thing about Panama was that you can register a ship there quite cheaply. Oh, and the canal, I suppose, and hats? Anyway, as we’ve since learned, there are other things you can pick up in the isthmus state, namely flexible banking arrangements which allow clients to launder money, dodge sanctions and avoid tax. International repercussions from the leaked release of the so-called Panama Papers have been considerable, not least of all for Downing Street. Yet, when you strip away all the hoo-hah, what I pick up is that there’s not a lot of surprise that David Cameron’s father had offshore investments or that his family benefited

Is there a Green surge in Wales?

Wales goes to the polls in May to choose a Welsh Assembly. We asked Evening Post columnist and public affairs specialist Lawrence Bailey to sketch out the state of the parties, their policies and how they might fare. His six-part series concludes today with the WALES GREEN PARTY As everyone knows, Greens are essentially good for you. The key factor however is whether enough voters have the appetite to back them. Wales has recently seen a “Green surge”. Membership has near enough trebled with an influx of predominantly young people looking for something different. Candidates insist they can win seats. That might have been possible if talks about an electoral pact with Plaid Cymru and Lib Dems

Lib Dems face a fight for survival

Wales goes to the polls in May to choose a Welsh Assembly. We asked Evening Post columnist and public affairs specialist Lawrence Bailey to sketch out the state of the parties, their policies and how they might fare. His six-part series continues with the WELSH LIBERAL DEMOCRATS To paraphrase Mark Twain, rumours of a Liberal Democrat wipe-out in Wales may have been somewhat exaggerated. The party’s recent electoral experiences admittedly read like a rags-to-riches-to-rags kind of tale, sprinkled with plot twists and tragedies. After making steady progress over a decade, a series of bad choices at Westminster triggered collateral damage in Wales and elsewhere. The impact on the party’s Assemb

Labour have a fight on their hands

Wales goes to the polls in May to choose a Welsh Assembly. We asked Evening Post columnist and public affairs specialist Lawrence Bailey to sketch out the state of the parties, their policies and how they might fare. His six-part series today looks at Welsh LABOUR. Labour has never had an outright working majority in the Senedd. That doesn’t look likely to change any time soon. Although they are party who brought about Welsh devolution, recognition for that achievement has been rare, even within their own ranks That is not to say that they’ve been left out in the cold. It may have involved spells of minority government, with all the attendant wrangles, plus a couple of coalitions but Labour

Seeking a Senedd breakthrough

Wales goes to the polls in May to choose a Welsh Assembly. We asked Evening Post columnist and public affairs specialist Lawrence Bailey to give a personal perspective on the state of the parties, their policies and how they might fare. His six-part series continues today with UKIP Wales. It’s a full ten years since David Cameron dismissed UK Independence Party as a bunch of "fruitcakes, loonies and closet racists”. Despite claiming not to regret the accusation, the prime minister doubtlessly regrets underestimating their sustained electoral appeal. Although unable to make any headway in last year’s general election, UKIP could be about to achieve a breakthrough in Wales as the fifth party.

Keeping the focus on Wales

Wales goes to the polls in May to choose a Welsh Assembly. We asked Evening Post columnist and public affairs specialist Lawrence Bailey to sketch out the state of the parties, their policies and how they might fare. Today he puts the Welsh CONSERVATIVES under the spotlight. The Conservatives are the unexpected success story of the Assembly. They’ve made slow but continual progress over the years through cleverly focused campaigning. This approach paid off at the last election when they became the official opposition, pushing Plaid Cymru into third spot. Andrew RT Davies will doubtlessly be hoping that electors regard his party as doing an effective job in scrutinising how the money gets spe

Can Plaid capitalise this time?

Wales goes to the polls in May to choose a Welsh Assembly. We asked Evening Post columnist and public affairs specialist Lawrence Bailey to sketch out the state of the parties, their policies and how they might fare. His six-part series starts today with PLAID CYMRU. This election is a make or break contest for the Party of Wales. It’s arguable that the same can be said for party leader Leanne Wood. Plaid Cymru’s seat tally since 1999 has been gradually declining. This campaign offers hope of a reverse in fortunes and even reinstatement as the second largest party in the Senedd. Although expected to perform reasonably well in their heartlands, the prospects of outright victory are remote. It

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